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FPB 64-6 Grey Wolf: Engine Room Art

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 100

At the risk of being repetitive, we thought you might like another look at the highest form of engine room art, this time FPB 64-6 Grey Wolf. The visual presentation of these engine rooms is better than we have ever seen before, anywhere, from any builder.

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 101

We don’t have time to caption each one, so we’ll let you wander and wonder at your leisure. Enjoy.

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 103

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 106

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 107

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 108

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 109

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 111

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 110

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 114

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 113

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 112

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 124

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 122

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 121

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 120

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 119

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 130

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 129

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 127

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 126

FPB 64 6 Gray Wolf Engine Room 125


Posted by Steve Dashew  (January 15, 2013)




16 Responses to “FPB 64-6 Grey Wolf: Engine Room Art”

  1. Alf Simpson Says:
    Sirs, As an engineer I find these posts to be very interesting and the workmanship is truly remarkable. Regards Alf

  2. Kevin Costello Says:
    Amazing… There are allot of long hours involved in there! What is the coating on the walls? Is it a spray on ceramic insulation like Lizard Skin… http://www.lizardskin.com/

    Steve Dashew Reply:

    The engine room surfaces and indeed the rest of the topsides and deck are coated in an Armaflex product.

  3. Rod Manser Says:
    Workmanship is great I should say also as an engineer. Better than many airplane makes, and from a certification standpoint, this is serious above and beyond the call of duty. Obviously they love their work at Circa.

  4. Raj Narayan Says:
    Functional Art Brilliantly designed, meticulously planned, flawlessly executed. I have never seen a mechanical space better done anywhere. –raj

  5. David Guest Says:
    Curiously, what are the two padlocks for?

    Steve Dashew Reply:

    Foredeck hatch locks.

  6. Scott Says:
    WOW! a hell of a lot better than the engine room I’m currently working with! I’ll show my lot what a fuel filter system SHOULD look like! and an excellent effort to photogragh it!

  7. David M. Says:
    Never noticed the ladder and hatch above the work bench before has it always been there? Nice to have natural light in the engine room.

    Steve Dashew Reply:

    Yes, ladder always there for egress from the engine room.

  8. Jim M Says:
    Noticed a shield over the drive shaft drip less stuffing box. I’m I correct?

    Steve Dashew Reply:

    Yes. Like all PYI “dripless” shaft seals, they spray a little.

  9. rene Says:
    In a number of engine room photos I noticed a V-drive and it looks like connected to the main engine? Remember they have a transmission loss of about 10-15%?? Am just surprised to see one in a boat with this length?

    Steve Dashew Reply:

    The V-drive is a ZF 280-V, and we have been told the efficiency loss is about four percent, compared to 2.5% or thereabouts for a straight. Whatever the losses, the FPB 64s report a fuel burn of around 5.0 to 5.5 US gallons/hour at 9.75 to 10.0 knots. Regarding their use, we prefer straight drives, but sometimes there are length restrictions which make the use of a v-drive neccessary.

  10. Matt Says:
    Hi there, I’m an engineer from Southampton, UK and love the engine room design! Where does the engine room get is ventilation from?

    Steve Dashew Reply:

    Hi Matt: Both FPB 64 and 97 have large vents built as Dorade boxes on the aft deck. These project into the engine room to a point where they are above the static waterline with tanks half full if the boat is inverted. The purpose of this is to reduce the amount of water that might find its way into the engine space. There are also exhaust fan(s) elsewhere as well.